27th
October
2016

PSLS16- Mitigating the Risk of Fraud

At last week’s Insights and Innovations Leadership Summit, Ben Larson, Informatics Specialist at Atlantic Health System and Founder: Analytics4all.org, presented Mitigating Fraud Risk – CyberAnalytic Surveillance of High-Value Assets.

Cybersecurity for clinical engineering departments presents a challenge unlike other business environments. The increased connectivity to existing computer networks has exposed medical devices to cybersecurity vulnerabilities from which they were previously protected. This interconnectivity leaves medical devices vulnerable to security breaches in the same way other networked computing systems are vulnerable. However, unlike other networked computing systems, there is an increasing concern that the connectivity of these medical devices will directly affect clinical care and patient safety.

For the prevention of cybersecurity incidents, it is important to recognize the complexity of the operational environment as well as to collect and document technical vulnerabilities. Ben Larson, Informatics Specialist at Atlantic Health System and Founder: Analytics4all.org, gave a compelling presentation Mitigating Fraud Risk – CyberAnalytic Surveillance of High-Value Assets, at PartsSource’s 2016 Leadership Summit.

“The world is random, humans are not. Even the most conscientious crook will leave a “fingerprint” in the data, “ stated Mr. Larson.  He further outlined the importance of putting together an internal strategy to detect cybersecurity, and how easy it is to find breaches with the tools already available. In summary, the steps necessary to detect fraud are to gather data from multiple resources, explore data gathering tools, use machine learning algorithms; analyze vast data sets to find even the smallest patterns, reach out to your BI team for help, and choose parts vendors, like PartsSource, who are data driven and willing to partner with you.

To ensure the future protection of medical devices in a networked world, a coordinated proactive approach that includes standard cybersecurity assessment and control, together with specific medical device data and workflow considerations, is necessary. Continuing to avoid the creation and implementation of a cybersecurity strategy, will inevitably create negative outcomes for clinical care and patient safety.